Tailoring Graduates Meeting

Today Francis (Uganda Director), Maureen (Livelihoods Officer) and Daisy (Education Officer) have been meeting with the graduating tailoring class to continue working through the transition from vocational training to entrepreneurs. Hope for Life Katanga is a CBO (Community Based Organisation) in Uganda, which means our beneficiaries are also members of the organisation. Their input both positive and negative is valued greatly in how we construct our programs going forward.     

The Complexity of Livelihoods

The Complexity of Livelihoods

At the start of this school year in Kampala, Hope for Life was able to provide formal schooling for 42 children and young adults from Katanga. This was the most we have ever sent and this is amazing! It is also, currently, almost completely useless. That’s right, I said, and meant, useless. I chose that word carefully though because I certainly do not mean to say pointless.

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Today's Catch-up Class Pictures

The junior class today matching up written numbers with the appropriate figures. More pictures here... 

Today's Tailoring Pictures

Today's trainee tailors working hard in the Hope for Life vocational training centre.  

Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence - Part 2

Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence - Part 2

I could carry on from Part 1 of this post, by sharing more stories of child sacrifice, FGM (Female Genital Mutilation), murder, corruption inc. police brutality, abduction, sex exploitation, slavery; all of which are forms of violence that are particularly detrimental for those who lack wealth, education and stature within their community - but I won’t. Instead we need to get informed and understand the root causes of violence, so that we can be proactive and effective in supporting the most vulnerable people around the world.

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Violence Against Women & Girls

Violence Against Women & Girls

Violence against women and girls is one of the most systematic and widespread human rights violations. It is rooted in gendered social structures rather than individual and random acts; it cuts across age, socio-economic, educational and geographic boundaries; affects all societies; and is a major obstacle to ending gender inequality and discrimination globally.

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Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence - Part 1

Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence - Part 1

When we think of global poverty we readily think of hunger, disease, homelessness, illiteracy, dirty water and a lack of education, but very few of us immediately think of the global poor’s chronic vulnerability to violence - the massive epidemic of sexual violence, forced labor, illegal detention, land theft, assault, police abuse, and oppression that lies hidden underneath the more visible deprivations of the poor.

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The Complexity Of Poverty

The Complexity Of Poverty

Unsurprisingly, I often find myself in conversations with people, chatting about the work I am a part of in Uganda. I find myself simplifying what we do as a charity to fit into a couple of sentences, even when I have 20 minutes in front of an audience, the best I can do is give a brief overview that gives you a hint of the complexity. Poverty is complex, but important to talk about.

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Start the new year right

Start the new year right

I'm sorry to say... the Christmas holidays are now officially over - Welcome to 2017. 

I assume that if you're like me you spent New Years Day bank holiday finding some fresh air to go for that last holiday winter walk, before putting the kettle on and sitting down to join 8.1 million viewers in watching the new series of Sherlock; all the while attempting to block out the thought of your alarm going off at a inhuman time in the morning. 

All those that we work with in Uganda will be returning back to Katanga during this month, after being with their wider families in 'the village' for the Christmas holidays. 

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Kick-start a Career

Kick-start a Career

Over the past five years, I've had the opportunity to chat with many individuals in Uganda about their hopes and dreams; their desires to see their children receiving an education or getting a good job when they are older, listening to stories about death and illness all because of relatively inexpensive medication and treatment, and even parents sharing with me their desire to gain a new skill, or simply having the opportunity to boost their income. 

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Class of 2011

Class of 2011

Five years ago today Megan and @markwalters_ had a class shot with the original 15 children taught by them in the catch-up class. We now have a full team of qualified, Ugandan teachers, trainers, social workers and health staff, who continue to work hard enabling families in #Uganda to realise their potential towards living a self-sufficient life. 
11 of these children are part of the 36 children who are now sponsored into a school in the city by @hflkatanga 
#EducationIsKey #SponsorAChildToday#EducationChangesEverything

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We are now 5 years old!

We are now 5 years old!

We celebrated five years of Hope for Life Katanga working in Uganda, with a fundraiser in Bristol and over 160 people in attendance. We are pleased to announce that £4,350 was raised on the night (not including Gift Aid and those who on the night have committed to giving monthly). In 2011, Megan and Mark teamed up with Francis, Moses and Joshua, to enable families in Uganda to realise their potential towards living a self-sufficient life. Five years later and we are working directly with close to 100 individuals in our Education and Livelihoods programs, as well as their families.  

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A Fire in Katanga: The Final Update

A Fire in Katanga: The Final Update

On September the 21st, there was a fire at the home of one of the families we work with in Katanga.

Luckily no one was hurt but the family of seven lost everything, including their source of income. You generously donated and we were able to send the money to our Uganda Director. He withdrew it and helped the mother buy and transport the basic items needed for her family. Mamma Phildausi was also able to buy the things necessary to start working again, selling samosas, cakes, fruits and vegetables from outside the burnt out home.

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